Jay Tavare – Gorgeous Native American Actor

Bailey here –

So while we’re on the topic of hot Natives, I found another one for you. Jay Tavare! And he is something. Not only is he gorgeous, has a hot bod and can act, he also did his own Emmy nominated stunt on CSI Miami – jumping out of a 23rd story building in 200 foot free fall! Not me. No thanks.

Jay is Apache, Navajo and Latin. And a nice mix of it to be sure. He is 5’11”, has hazel eyes and black hair – and lots of muscle. His favorite meal is breakfast and his favorite colors are red, black and tan. Jay believes that one way we can all help the environment – and save trees – is to stop requesting useless ATM print-outs. Such a small thing, but done by many would make a HUGE difference.

Where can you see Jay – besides here in my journal?

Movie and TV Appearances:

  • Cold Mountain
  • The Missing
  • CSI Miami
  • Into the West – one of my favorites!
  • Vatos Locos
  • Pathfinder
  • El Padrino
  • Among others . . .

Jay has also been on the covers of Cosmopolitan, GQ, Vogue and Vanity Fair. He’s been featured in articles in The Hollywood Reporter, Entertainment Weekly, LA Confidential – and my personal favorite – Cowboys and Indians.

Jay lives in Los Angeles and writes screenplays and non-fiction magazine articles in his spare time. He’s also a sought after speaker for a variety of subjects including American Indian history, diet and nutrition, and health and fitness.

Jay is a humanitarian and a dog lover. Jay supports the Adopt-an-Elder program by having adopted several Navajo elders and a Navajo family, providing desperately needed food and clothing to those in need. He’s also actively involved in Samoyed and Wolfdog rescue, owning a Samoyed of his own.

Check out more about Jay on his website at http://jaytavare.com/

Adam Beach – Native Actor

Bailey here again –

Adam Beach is a prolific Native actor you’ve likely seen on TV, at the movies, or both. He most recently co-starred with Harrison Ford in the movie, Cowboys & Aliens.

Adam was born in Manitoba, Canada and grew up with his two brothers on the Dog Creek First Nations Reserve. He was eight years old when his mother was killed by a drunk driver. Eight weeks later, his father drowned. Adam doesn’t like to recall his childhood very often because it was so painful. He and his two brothers eventually were taken to Winnipeg to live with an aunt and uncle (his father’s brother), who he refers to as “dad.”

Adam made a name for himself as Victor Joseph in the award-winning film, Smoke Signals. He played opposite Nicolas Cage in Windtalkers, the story of the World War II Navajo code talkers, and received acclaim for his powerful starring role as Ira Hayes in Flags of Our Fathers, directed by Clint Eastwood and produced by Steven Spielberg.

He has also received a Golden Globe Award nomination for his portrayal as Charles Eastman in the film Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. He’s also worked extensively in television, appearing on HBO’s fourth season of Big Love as the manager of the Indian casino; as a series regular on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, playing the role of Ice-T’s partner, Chester Lake; and in the CBS miniseries Comanche Moon. Adam currently has a recurring role on ABC’s new series Combat Hospital (2011).

Adam brings a unique and diverse perspective to his work as he is strongly rooted in his Native heritage. He received the Best Actor Award from the American Indian Film Festival for his role of Frank Fencepost in the film Dance Me Outside.

Adam’s commitment to his spiritual development through traditional grass dancing enhances his work. He spends his spare time playing hockey and generously donating his voice and enthusiasm in support of Native youth.

Adam’s film and television involvement is so extensive I can’t list it all here. But you can check him out on his IMDB page at: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0063440/

Indian Captive – The Story of Mary Jemison

Bailey here –

I’ve been reading the Newberry Honor book, Indian Captive, written and illustrated by Lois Lenski. I know, I know, we all read this story in the 4th grade, but I’m reading it again. It’s such an amazing book!

It’s a true account of how twelve year old Mary Jemison, or Molly as she is affectionately called, was taken captive by Indians (and French solders) on a spring day in 1758 – during the French and Indian War. Terrified, separated from her family, and determined to escape, Molly was forced to walk on a long and arduous journey away from everything and everyone she knew.

The story follows her to a Seneca village where she was given to an Indian family in exchange for a son and brother who was killed by the whites. And it follows her through the grief of missing her family, the terror of not knowing how to communicate with the Indians, how to eat their food, or understand their customs.

But there were those in the Indian village who were kind to Molly, who was renamed Corn Tassel because of her beautiful yellow hair. And she began to learn the Seneca language with the help of a kind Indian boy, Little Turtle.

Later, when Mary Jemison – The White Woman of the Genesee – had the chance to return to her own people, she decided to stay with the Seneca. She’d fallen in love with the people, their way of life and their customs. She married an Indian man, and when he died, she married another Indian man. She lived the rest of her life with the Seneca, until she died at about 90 years old.

It’s a heart wrenching and inspiring book. You’ve just got to read it.

Jeeping in Ouray, Colorado

Bailey here –

I promised to show you Ouray, Colorado, so here goes. I loved Ouray! What a gorgeous little town that seemed to me to be a caldera (volcano) surrounded by steep mountains on all sides. Why else would there be a hot springs and a hot river flowing through it?

Centuries before white men arrived, the Tabeguache Utes, a nomadic Indian tribe, traveled to Ouray in the summer months to hunt game and soak in the “sacred miracle waters”. They knew the springs that simmer beneath much of Ouray were therapeutic. The town’s original name was “Uncompahgre,” the Ute word for “hot water springs” and the hot river running through town is called the Uncompaghre River.

The Utes served as guides for expeditions crossing the southern Rockies in the 1700s. Spanish explorers named the rugged mountain range the San Juan Mountains, but the Spaniards weren’t interested in settling such a harsh and unforgiving environment. It was the miners, flooding the region in the late 1800’s in search of silver and gold, who’d forever change the face of the San Juans. In fact, many of the roads we jeeped on were access routes that miners made over a hundred years ago.

In 1873, the famous Ute Chief, Ouray, reluctantly signed a government treaty releasing the Ute’s treasured San Juan Mountains to encroaching settlers. The town, officially incorporated in 1876, was named in Ouray’s honor. Although the locals say it ‘you-ray’ not ‘ew-ray’ and they’ll correct you. In its first year, 400 struggling inhabitants forged their way through the long frozen winter and eagerly greeted spring with its blooming alpine flowers, rushing brooks and gentle mountain rains.

By 1880 with the frenzy for precious metals, Ouray had grown into a booming mining town with over 2,600 inhabitants. The town included a school, several churches, a hospital, restaurants, saloons and brothels, hardware, clothing and supply stores for the miners, hotels and boarding houses. By 1888, the town would celebrate the arrival of the Denver Rio Grande Railroad. Less than five years later, the value of silver fell drastically challenging the resolve of Ouray’s residents.

As you can see, the jeeping was beautiful and amazing. And the guys had lots of fun. I love to watch guys in their Jeeps try to conquer an insurmountable pass. Sometimes they even make it! And it sure makes for some great pics.

We made it to several summits, saw glacier lakes, awesome storms, and lots of marmots (big rodents). The wildflowers this year were incredible. It’s not like this every year and I felt very special to be able to see them in their glory. It was definitely an epic summer vacation!

Oh, and don’t forget you can click on any picture to see a bigger version of it.

Rick Mora – Gorgeous Native

Bailey here again –

It’s been a while since I’ve written about a Native hunk, so here we go. Ever heard of Rick Mora? Hmmmm. He’s nice. VERY nice. And apparently, he’s a very busy guy. Rick is an actor, model, photographer and producer. He’s also a speaker and has done radio broadcasting.

Rick, an Apache / Yaqui Native, holds a Bachelors Degree in Communication from Cal State, Northridge. He started acting and modeling soon after graduating and was discovered by male super model agent, Omar Alberto, who envisioned the Native man in entertainment. (Thank you, Omar!)

Rick played Warrior #1 in the movie Twilight in the flashback scene when Jacob explains to Bella about the history of his Tribe with the Cold Ones. (I remember that scene!) He’s also had starring roles in The Dead and the Damned, the VILA Chronicles and Operation Repo. He is the voice of Young Turok in the animated feature Turok: Son of Stone, based on the video game, also starring Native actors, Adam Beach and Graham Greene.

As a model, Rick has 4 posters (oh yeah!) being distributed by photographer Carlos Reynosa (http://carlosreynosa.com/). As a photographer, Rick has 9 commissioned pieces to date. He specializes in landscapes, but also shoots headshots, portfolios, children and weddings. (I think I need a headshot!) As a music lover, Rick discovers, develops and produces musicians and bands in the brutal music business. (Darn, I have no musical talent whatsoever. )

Rick also supports the fight against domestic and sexual abuse against Native women. A noble endeavor for a very serious problem.
 

“I am a dreamer committed to bringing my dreams to reality.” – Rick Mora

http://www.rickmora.com

Southern Ute Cultural Information

Bailey here – 

I got a little busy last week because of some tough classes and lots of homework, but I’m back. I promised to tell you about the Ute Cultural Center, the Casino – and the Southern Ute Drum, and I always keep my promises. 

Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum 

The Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum is a culmination of more than 24 years of planning and development by the Southern Ute people – many of whom participated by sharing their stories, Ute artifacts, photos, clothing and beading. This beautiful architectural masterpiece will be a focus for Southern Ute cultural preservation, education and community activities for people of all ages. 

As you can see in the photo, the Museum’s central Welcome Gallery represents the shape and texture of the traditional wickiup. Each panel in the Gallery is unique – with its own shape and curve – so that only with computer aided design was this structure made possible. The two wings of the building look raised and ready for flight – symbolizing of the wings of the sacred eagle. 

Seen from within the Welcome Gallery – at the top of the wickuip – is the Circle of Life Window. It represents the four sacred directions, and the four stages of human life. East is infancy, South is youth, West is adult, and North is the elderly stage of life. 

This amazing Museum is not yet open, but is almost ready to take flight. 

The Circle of Life Worldwide Welcome at the Museum takes place on May 21-22, 2011. The Museum is scheduled to be open to the public in June 2011. 

Check out the Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum at http://www.succm.org/ 

Sky Ute Casino 

The Sky Ute Casino – next door to the Cultural Center and Museum – is a luxury hotel and casino. Slot machines, craps, roulette, bingo, blackjack and poker await those who are ‘of age.’ Of course I can’t gamble yet – not old enough – but they have an indoor swimming pool with a sun deck, a bowling alley, miniature golf and a state-of-the-art arcade. And the casino boasts five different restaurants. Yum! 

Check out the Sky Ute Casino at http://www.skyutecasino.com

Southern Ute Drum  – Tribal Newspaper 

The Southern Ute Drum newspaper – which won four 2010 Native American Journalist Association Awards – is the Tribe’s bi-weekly newspaper. Within its pages you can find cultural news, coverage of cultural events, and pictures of the beautiful Ute people. There are also sections on hunting, sports, education, the Tribal government, business and health. 

Check out the Southern Ute Drum at http://www.southern-ute.nsn.us/DRUM/Default.htm.

Southern Ute Tribe

http://www.southern-ute.nsn.us/

Southern Ute Bear Dance, Sun Dance and Pow Wows

Bailey here again – 

I promised to write about the Southern Ute festivals, and I always honor my promises. 

The Bear Dance 

The Bear Dance, held in the spring, is the oldest and most historic of the Southern Ute dances. Legend has it that two brothers were hunting when one of them noticed a bear doing a dance while scratching a tree. The bear taught the hunter the dance, along with songs, to take back to his people. The songs showed respect to the bear spirit, and respect to the bear spirit makes one strong. 

The Bear Dance is still celebrated today with a dance corral, drums and singing, festive costumes and good food. The women wear colorful broom skirts and shawls, many of which are homemade especially for the dance. It’s women’s choice, so the women ask the men to dance by flicking their shawls toward the men they wish to dance with. It’s a no risk proposition, since it’s against the rules for a man in the dance corral to refuse an invitation. 

Another tradition is to wear plumes during the dance. The plumes represent troubles or hardships endured over the last year. The plumes are left at the entrance of the dance corral when the dance ends to signify leaving old troubles behind and starting life anew. 

The Sun Dance

The Sun Dance, held in the middle of the summer, is the most important and sacred spiritual ceremony in the Ute tradition. The Sun Dance has two major aspects to it, the personal and the communal.

Each dancer, traditionally male, receives a command through a dream that compels him to participate in the dance. At the visible level, he goes through a rigorous fast and dances inside the Sun Dance lodge. At the spiritual level, the dancer goes through purification and attempts communion with the Great Spirit. The dancer goes through the pains and rigors of the spiritual quest alone, but he is also part of a family. And his family is there, outside of the Sun Dance lodge, to support him by singing, drumming or praying for him. 

The Sun Dance brings spiritual rejuvenation to the entire Ute community and reinforces the common spiritual power which has traditionally bound them together.

The Pow Wow

The Southern Ute Pow Wows are gatherings held throughout the year where both Native and non-Native people gather to meet, dance, sing and honor Native American culture. They are a time for Southern Ute Tribal members, and members of other Tribes throughout the country, to get together and showcase their many talents.

The Pow Wows feature dance and drum contests, often with thousands of dollars in prize money.

Here is a list of the Durango Area Pow Wows:

  • March  – Hozhoni Days Pow Wow
  • June – Sky Ute Casino Pow wow
  • September – Southern Ute Fair Pow Wow

Next time I’ll you about the Southern Ute Cultural Center and Museum, the Sky Ute Casino, and the Southern Ute Drum.

Southern Ute Tribe

http://www.southern-ute.nsn.us/

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